The vision section of the GMMP establishes the community’s values, priorities and vision for the future of Gallup. It is one, if not THE most important, section of the document in terms of providing a roadmap for the remaining plan elements. The project team is took public comments on the Vision Draft until October 20th, 2023.


Vision Presentation

Our Vision:

Let Us Know What You Think!

Do you agree with the draft vision statement?

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Guiding Principles

The following guiding principles represent the themes and values voiced by the community during the outreach events and community survey conducted during the Summer of 2023. The six principles describe the values and aspirations for Gallup’s future over the next 20 years.

Cultural, historic, and natural resources are protected, preserved, and celebrated.

Improve opportunities for residents to lead healthy, active lives with access to quality and affordable healthcare, parks, open spaces healthy food, and community services. Residents are protected from harm where they live, work, learn, and play.

Foster an environment where businesses stay and expand. The local economy supports a diverse mix of market activities and promotes financial security for all residents.

Shape a strong community identity and branding.

Encourage and expand a safe, connective, multi-modal transportation system.

All community members have access to housing options, recreational and community services, and economic opportunity. All residents have opportunity to participate, prosper, and reach their full potential. The community recognizes, addresses, and prevents repetition of past injustices.

Provide input or edits on the draft vision statement and draft guiding principles!

Future Development Framework

The Future Development Framework Map is the physical manifestation of the vision that identifies the general future land use vision for the various areas of Gallup. It establishes a range of development classifications across a rural-to-urban transect that set general development parameters in regard to the mix, intensity, and character of future development.

The Future Development Map depicts the “preferred” development vision for property within the city’s municipal limits and annexation priority zones. It is a community’s visual guide to future planning. It is the key exhibit in the Growth Management Master Plan that will be utilized by the City government to guide growth within the City over the next 20 years. When Zone Changes are reviewed by the governing bodies, such as Planning and Zoning Commission and City Council, they will use this map to guide whether or not the change is consistent with the community vision and should or shouldn’t be approved. The map illustrates what the community wants to have happen; it is not a prediction.

The proposed Future Vision Map is a draft based on input from the general public, an official Steering Committee, city staff, the Planning and Zoning Commission and City Council during the public visioning events that occurred during the summer of 2023.

Development Character Classifications

The subsequent section establishes the development parameters for the appropriate mix of land uses, development intensity and character of development and redevelopment occurring with development classification areas.

The GMMP establishes the following development classification designations for the City of Gallup, which are depicted in the Future Development Map:

  1. Open Space Reserves
  2. Rural
  3. Suburban
  4. Regional Commercial
  5. Business / Industrial Zones or Parks
  6. Civic / Institutional
  7. Urban Neighborhoods
  8. Downtown

The subsequent section outlines the development parameters for the appropriate mixed of land uses, development intensity and character of development and redevelopment within the designated development classification areas. Corresponding mixed-use overlays that provide opportunities for more walkable, mixed-use development patterns are described in in the Mixed-Use Overlay Designations Section below.

Quick Poll

Do you agree with the development character classifications?

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Yes
0% (0 votes)
No
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Other - Please explain in the forum below
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Total Votes: 1

Rural

Rural development areas are lands designated for preservation, permit limited resource extraction, agricultural and commercial related activities, as well as low-density residential development characterized by large lots.

The GMMP establishes the following rural place classifications for the City of Gallup:

  • Open Space Reserves
  • Rural Zones

Open Space Reserves are lands designated for the protection or conservation of natural or cultural resources, wildlife and native plant habitat, and/or scenic and aesthetic viewsheds. Open space reserves shall remain primarily open and undeveloped.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES:

  • Open space preserves or similar natural areas
  • Environmentally sensitive areas such as old mines or steep terrain
  • Arroyos and drainage channels

REPRESENTATIVE ZONING DISTRICTS:

  • Rural Holding Zone

REPRESENTATIVE DEVELOPMENT PATTERNS:

  • Conserve reserves as primarily open and undeveloped lands
  • Limited community facilities in strategic locations whose scale and design are minimal to complement and blend with the natural open area

Rural region development patterns tend to be more auto-oriented as housing developments are clustered around amble open space reserves and limited commercial services are dispersed along major streets or intersections.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES:

·Natural areas and general open space

·Resource extraction activities

·Agricultural or ranch lands

·Single-family detached dwellings

REPRESENTATIVE ZONING DISTRICTS:

·Rural Residential (RR)

·Mobile Home Park (MHP)

·Planned Unit Development (PUD)

·General Commercial (GC)

REPRESENTATIVE DEVELOPMENT PATTERNS:

·Sparsely settled / populated lands in a cultivated or open state.

·Ample, continuous open spaces throughout subdivisions or development tracts.

·Low housing densities on large lots or in cluster development patterns.

·Limited commercial services that should be primarily located along arterials and collectors, particularly at major street intersections.

Suburban

Suburban areas are lands designated to provide for low-to-moderate density residential land uses intermixed with areas of lower intensity commercial, retail, and office uses to serve them. Development patterns tend to be more auto-oriented and linear with multi-tenant strip commercial developments along major streets such as arterials or collectors surrounded by low-density residential neighborhoods. Future developments within suburban areas should prioritize the creation of mixed-use neighborhoods that offer greater integration and variety of housing types and commercial developments that prioritize improved pedestrian connectivity to destinations, within developments and to nearby neighborhoods.

Suburban commercial areas generally located along major arterial or collector streets or at major intersections provide a variety of lower intensity commercial, retail, and office that serve nearby residential suburban neighborhoods.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES:

  • Neighborhood serving commercial services
  • Civic and institutional uses

REPRESENTATIVE ZONING DISTRICTS:

  • General Commercial (GC)

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PATTERN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Locate suburban commercial uses that generate high traffic volumes along arterials and collector streets, particularly at major street intersections.
  • Increase pedestrian amenities and connectivity within development sites as well as to nearby transit stops or multi-modal opportunities, and neighborhoods.
  • Ensure transitions in the form of building height step-downs and/or landscape buffers between suburban commercial areas and suburban neighborhood areas.

Suburban neighborhoods surrounding these corridors provide a variety of housing options ranging from single-family, detached and attached, two-family and low-density multi-family housing options on a variety of lot sizes and dimensions along with two-family dwellings and low-density apartments.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES:

  • Single-family dwellings, detached and attached
  • Low-to-high density multi-family residential
  • Civic and institutional uses

REPRESENTATIVE ZONING DISTRICTS:

  • Single-Family Residential, Detached (SFR)
  • Multi-Family Residential Low (MFRL)
  • Multi-Family Residential Medium (MFRM)
  • Planned Unit Development (PUD)

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PATTERN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Permit a greater diversity of low-to-medium single-family residential dwelling types, with varied lots sizes and configurations, setbacks and other spatial characteristic throughout suburban neighborhoods.
  • Distribute low-to-medium multi-family dwellings throughout suburban neighborhoods to enable mixed-use neighborhoods. Encourage multi-family development along / near major arterial and collector streets, near employment and transit opportunities and within designated mixed-use overlays or similar activity centers to the greatest extent feasible.
  • Permit high-density multi-family dwellings only if found appropriate by the governing bodies, within designated mixed-use overlays, along arterials or at major intersections when feasible. Consider site and building design conditions that ensure compatibility in scale of form and/or appropriate transitions such as building step-downs or buffers to lower density dwellings surrounding them
  • Ensure quality common open space amenities for residents within medium-to-high density multi-family developments.
  • Ensure provisions for convenient pedestrian and bicycle facilities to neighborhood assets such as parks or civic / institutional uses.
  • Ensure transitions in the form of building height step-downs and/or landscape buffers between higher density multi-family dwellings / suburban commercial and lower-density suburban neighborhood areas.

Civic and Institutional areas are designated for large public or private facilities such as school campuses, colleges, community centers, libraries, government buildings and any associated park or open space.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES

  • K-12 educational facilities
  • Higher education facilities
  • Community facilities
  • Government facilities
  • Religious Institutions

REPRESENTATIVE ZONING DISTRICTS:

  • General Commercial (GC)
  • Heavy Commercial (HC)

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PATTERN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Ensure provisions for a system of convenient pedestrian and bicycle facilities that promotes connectivity to and within the institutional parcels for adjacent residential developments and to any adjacent streets and transit opportunities.
  • Locate institutional facilities such as religious institutions, schools, and community buildings on arterial or collector streets and major intersections to the greatest extent feasible.
  • Ensure transitions in the form of building height step-downs and/or landscape buffers between higher density multi-family dwellings / suburban commercial and lower-density suburban neighborhood areas.

More regional commercial or business / industrial parks provide lands designated to serve as a city wide and regional draw provide a wider, more intense range of non-residential uses generally at major regional corridors, e.g. primarily arterial streets or above, as well as major interstate exits and street intersections.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES:

  • General retail sales and services, often located in large multi-tenant shopping centers or malls.
  • Hotels and restaurants
  • Professional offices
  • Civic and institutional uses

REPRESENTATIVE ZONING DISTRICTS:

  • Heavy Commercial (HC)

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PATTERN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Ensure transitions in the form of building height step-downs and/or landscape buffers between regional commercial and any surrounding lower-density suburban areas.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES:

  • Professional office
  • Research and development
  • Limited commercial services
  • Transportation related uses
  • Utility related uses
  • Warehousing and Manufacturing

REPRESENTATIVE ZONING DISTRICTS:

  • General Commercial (GC)
  • Heavy Commercial (HC)
  • Industrial (I)

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PATTERN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Ensure provisions for a system of convenient pedestrian and bicycle facilities that promotes connectivity within and between adjacent non-residential developments and to any adjacent streets and transit opportunities
  • Ensure transition between more intense / dense non-residential land uses to residential neighborhoods

Urban

Urban areas are lands designated to provide a high variety and intensity of both residential and non-residential land uses within compact, built environment that improves and encourage pedestrian activity and mobility.

Development patterns in urban centers are more pedestrian-oriented with mixed-use buildings that contain commercial services on the ground floor and office and/or housing above, which are sited directly on the adjacent street frontages that are part of a well-connected, grided network that provides a variety of pedestrian and bicycle facilities and amenities.

Downtown is the premier destination designated for a mix of high-intensity residential and destination retail uses that are intended to create an energized environment to live, work, and play.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES:

  • Medium-to-high density multi-family uses
  • Civic and institutional uses
  • Commercial, lodging, and retail uses

REPRESENTATIVE ZONING DISTRICTS:

  • Mixed-Use Center (MXC)

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PATTERN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Maintain and promote street grid interconnectivity within Downtown.
  • Ensure small block sizes are maintained and require redevelopment to provide street extensions that reinforce small block sizes where they don’t exist.
  • Prioritize wide pedestrian sidewalks with amenities such as street trees and furnishings along downtown streets.
  • Ensure provisions for convenient pedestrian and bicycle facilities to neighborhood assets such as parks, civic spaces, or civic / institutional uses.
  • Prioritize the development of high-density multi-family within Downtown.
  • Ensure quality common open space amenities for residents within medium-to-high density multi-family developments.
  • Ensure mixed-use developments are site directly adjacent to street frontage with shallow building setbacks.
  • Consider more lenient parking minimums or completely eliminating parking requirements within Downtown to incentivize redevelopment,
  • Conceal parking areas behind buildings and within structures to the greatest extent feasible.
  • Encourage building and site design that activates downtown streets through building frontage, entrances, parking areas, and gathering spaces.

The City’s historic residential Urban neighborhoods surrounding Downtown provide a wider variety of single-family, attached or detached, and more medium-density “missing middle” housing options than suburban neighborhoods.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES:

·Single-family dwellings, detached and attached

·Low-to-medium density multi-family residential

·Neighborhood serving office and commercial uses

REPRESENTATIVE ZONING DISTRICTS:

·Mixed-Use Neighborhood (MXN)

·Multi-Family Residential Low (MFRL)

·Multi-Family Residential Medium (MFRM)

·Multi-Family Residential High (MFRH)

·Planned Unit Development (PUD)

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PATTERN CONSIDERATIONS:

·Ensure small block sizes are maintained and require redevelopment to provide street extensions that reinforce small block sizes where they don’t exist.

·Prioritize the creation and maintenance of wide pedestrian sidewalks within urban neighborhoods.

·Permit a greater diversity of low-to-medium single-family residential dwelling types, with varied lots sizes and configurations, setbacks and other spatial characteristic throughout suburban neighborhoods.

·Encourage the distribution of more “middle missing” and low-to-medium multi-family dwellings throughout urban neighborhoods to enable mixed-use neighborhoods. Promote multi-family development along / near major arterial and collector streets, near employment and transit opportunities and within designated mixed-use overlays or similar activity centers to the greatest extent feasible.

·Permit high-density multi-family dwellings only if found appropriate by the governing bodies, within designated mixed-use overlays, along arterials or at major intersections when feasible. Consider site and building design conditions that ensure compatibility in scale of form and/or appropriate transitions such as building step-downs or buffers to lower density dwellings surrounding them.

·Ensure quality common open space amenities for residents within medium-to-high density multi-family developments.

·Consider more lenient parking minimums for residential and civic/institutional uses within urban neighborhoods.

·Locate institutional facilities such as religious institutions, schools, and community buildings on arterial or collector streets and major intersections to the greatest extent feasible.

·Ensure transitions in the form of building height step-downs and/or landscape buffers between higher density multi-family dwellings and existing lower-density dwellings within urban neighborhoods.

Mixed-Use Overlay Designations

In addition to the Development Character Classifications found above in the Development Character Classifications section, the GMMP designates mixed-use overlay types in which more walkable, mixed-use development patterns should be promoted going forward. More intense growth and development, particularly commercial and higher-density multi-family apartments, should be directed to these overlay areas. Development and redevelopment within these overlays should also prioritize pedestrian-oriented development patterns that are more walkable and provide pedestrian connections between commercial service anchors, jobs, residences and civic/open spaces than the suburban areas that surround them. By directing redevelopments of moderate-to-high density mixed land uses into overlay areas social and economic activities are concentrated to create destination centers that reduce urban sprawl, automobile trip generation, and service costs.

The GMMP establishes the following Mixed-use Overlay designations for the City of Gallup:

  • Neighborhood Center
  • Regional Employment Center
  • Regional Town Center
  • Downtown District
  • Mixed-use Corridor

Similar to the development classifications, overlay areas occur on a transect and therefore can accommodate mixed-use developments ranging from more moderate intensity at the neighborhood center to high intensity within the Downtown. Development patterns in more suburban neighborhood centers will tend to consist of more auto-oriented commercial centers located along major arterials or at major street intersections. Future development or redevelopment within suburban centers should prioritize the creation of mixed-use nodes that incorporate medium-to-high density multi-family housing types and improved pedestrian connectivity to the center, within the center and to nearby commercial districts and neighborhoods. Development patterns in urban centers or corridors are envisioned to be the most walkable, pedestrian-oriented areas within Gallup consisting of mixed-use buildings that contain commercial services on the ground floor and office and/or housing above. Such mixed-use buildings should be sited directly on the adjacent street frontages that are part of a well-connected, gridded network that provide a variety of pedestrian and bicycle facilities and amenities.

The Mixed-Use Overlay map identifies specific corridors and centers within which more urban, mixed-use development patterns should be promoted going forward. The subsequent section defines representative land uses and development patterns for development and redevelopment envisioned to occur with mixed-use overlay zones.

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Total Votes: 1

Share Your Thoughts on the Draft Future Mixed-Use Overlays!

Neighborhood Centers include a mix of low to medium-density multi-family residential and neighborhood serving commercial services that support the surrounding residential neighborhoods.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES:

  • Medium-to-high multi-family residential
  • Commercial services
  • Civic and institutional facilities

REPRESENTATIVE ZONING DISTRICTS:

  • Multi-Family Residential Medium (MFRM)
  • Planned Unit Development (PUD)
  • General Commercial (GC)

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PATTERN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • ·Preserve logical corridors through development parcels within designated centers to ensure possible future street extensions of major streets that could create and maintain small, walkable blocks.
  • ·Ensure adequate provisions for a system of convenient pedestrian pathways and sidewalks and bicycle facilities to and within the center.
  • ·Encourage the development of medium-to-high density multi-family dwellings within neighborhood centers.
  • ·Ensure transitions in the form of building height step-downs and/or landscape buffers between high-density development within the center and existing lower-density dwellings.

Regional Employment Center areas designated for concentrations of a wide range of non-residential uses in campus-like environment.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES:

  • Professional office
  • Research and development
  • Limited commercial services
  • Transportation related uses
  • Utility related uses
  • Warehousing and Manufacturing

REPRESENTATIVE ZONING DISTRICTS:

  • Heavy Commercial (HC)
  • Industrial (I)

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PATTERN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Ensure adequate provisions for a system of convenient pedestrian pathways and sidewalks as well as bicycle facilities to and within the center, particularly between major anchors.
  • Ensure transitions in the form of building height step-downs and/or landscape buffers between high-density non-residential development within the center and any existing lower-density dwellings that surrounds them.

Regional Town Centers is designated to include a mix of high-density multi-family residential, commercial, and civic / institutional land uses that collectively create a vibrant activity center.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES:

  • General retail sales and services, often located in multi-tenant shopping centers
  • Hotels and restaurants
  • Professional offices
  • Civic and institutional uses
  • High-density multi-family

REPRESENTATIVE ZONING DISTRICTS:

  • Multi-Family Residential High (MFRH)
  • Planned Unit Development (PUD)
  • Heavy Commercial (HC)

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PATTERN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Preserve logical corridors through development parcels within designated centers to ensure possible future street extensions of major streets that could create and maintain small, walkable blocks.
  • Ensure adequate provisions for a system of convenient pedestrian pathways and sidewalks as well as bicycle facilities to and within the center, particularly between major anchors.
  • Encourage high-density multi-family dwellings within Regional Town Centers.
  • Promote civic and recreational spaces that are a regional amenity.
  • Consider more lenient parking minimums and shared parking provisions for development within Regional Town Centers.
  • Ensure transitions in the form of building height step-downs and/or landscape buffers between high-density residential and non-residential development within the center and any existing lower-density dwellings that surrounds them.

Downtown is the premier destination designated for a mix of high-intensity residential, destination retail, and civic and institutional uses that are intended to create an energized environment to live, work, and play.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES:

  • High-density multi-family uses
  • Civic and institutional uses
  • Commercial, lodging, and retail uses

Representative Zoning District:

  • Mixed-Use Center (MXC)

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PATTERN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Maintain and promote street grid interconnectivity within downtown
  • Create and maintain small block sizes
  • Prioritize pedestrian facilities and amenities within the design of downtown streets, between, and among developments
  • Ensure mixed-use developments are site directly adjacent to street frontage with shallow building setbacks
  • Conceal parking areas behind buildings and within structures
  • Encourage building and site design that activates downtown streets through building frontage, entrances, parking areas, and gathering spaces.
  • Ensure transitions in the form of building height step-downs and/or landscape buffers between high-density residential and non-residential development within the center and any existing lower-density dwellings along shared borders with urban neighborhoods that surrounds them.

Mixed-Use Corridors are designated to support a mix of medium to high multi-family residential and commercial land uses along designated streets like Route 66. This place type mimics the built environment of a central business district or other mixed-use activity centers by combining residential and non-residential land uses within buildings or on shared parcels but arranges such uses in a linear manner along the street.

REPRESENTATIVE LAND USES:

  • Medium-to-high density multi-family uses
  • Civic and institutional uses
  • Commercial, lodging, and retail uses

REPRESENTATIVE ZONING DISTRICTS:

  • Multi-Family Residential Medium (MFRM)
  • Multi-Family Residential High (MFRH)
  • Planned Unit Development (PUD)
  • General Commercial (GC)
  • Heavy Commercial (HC)

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT PATTERN CONSIDERATIONS:

  • Prioritize wide pedestrian sidewalks with amenities such as street trees and furnishings and the inclusion of bicycle facilities within Mixed-use Corridors.
  • Limit curb cuts to minimize disruptions to pedestrians and bicyclists to the maximum extent feasible.
  • Consider more lenient parking minimums and shared parking provisions for development within Mixed-use Corridors.
  • Prioritize high-density multi-family dwellings along designated mixed-use corridors.
  • Ensure mixed-use developments are sited directly adjacent to street frontage with shallow building setbacks.
  • Encourage building and site design that activates the street corridor through building frontage, entrances, parking areas, and gathering spaces.
  • Ensure transitions in the form of building height step-downs and/or landscape buffers between high-density residential and non-residential development along the Mixed-use Corridor and any existing lower-density dwellings with areas that surround them.

Annexation Priorities

Annexation is the process of expanding the City’s boundaries to include more property within the City limits. Annexation is the process of expanding the City’s boundaries to include more property within the City limits. This Annexation Priority Map highlights areas that could be annexed, or added into the City’s boundary, over the next 20 years.

The Annexation Priority Map is the key exhibit in the Growth Management Master Plan that will be utilized by the City government to guide requests in regards with community priorities on where to invest City resources over the next 20 years. The proposed Annexation Priority Map is a draft based on the previous Growth Management Plan and input from the general public, an official Steering Committee, city staff, the Planning and Zoning Commission and City Council that occurred during the summer of 2023.

The GMMP establishes the following annexation priorities for the City of Gallup:

Lands generally have basic infrastructure in place and, subject to available service capacities, may be suited for annexation or areas whose annexation would be advantageous to the community due to their ability to provide employment, service or housing opportunities. Annexation of priority 1 zones may occur within the next 5 to 10 years.

Lands considered potentially developable for City expansion but are not readily serviceable or accessible. The feasibility and time frame for providing services and access should be examined closely as part of an annexation request. Annexation of these areas would not likely occur in the near future. Annexation for priority 2 zones may occur within 10 to 20 years if adequate infrastructure is extended.

Lands are generally regarded as undevelopable due to physical conditions, ownership patterns, or high infrastructure costs. They should not be considered for annexation except to provide a transitional buffer for developed areas or lands designated in annexation priority 1 or 2 areas, or to encourage continuity for City growth or access to areas necessary for proper City growth. Annexation of priority 2 zones is not likely within the next 20 years but may occur in the future.

Where future annexation is proposed, it should be considered by the City of Gallup in relation to its appropriateness and compatibility with the annexation priorities depicted in the Annexation Priority Map. Annexation procedures and decision criteria are governed by the Gallup Land Development Standards Section 13-1.